Turning the tide on biodiversity loss – will we make it? Event as iCalendar

(Science Event Tags, Biodiversity and Biosecurity, Biological Sciences)

31 May 2018

5:15pm

Venue: Old Government House Lecture Theatre

Location: 22 Princes Street, City Campus, Auckland

Host: School of Biological Sciences

Cost: Free. Refreshments will follow this inaugural lecture in Old Government House.

Professor Jacqueline Beggs, School of Biological Sciences
Professor Jacqueline Beggs, School of Biological Sciences

Inaugural lecture by Professor Jacqueline Beggs

New Zealand was one of the last large land masses to be colonised by humans, so the consequences of human arrival are still playing out and a good deal of our native biota and ecosystems are threatened.

Understanding the processes and key drivers of biodiversity loss is fundamental in halting the decline. In New Zealand, one of the main threats are invasive species.

Although we have made great strides managing some of these pests, there remain many challenges if we are to retain the essence of a biota that is distinctively Aotearoa.

Using examples from her involvement with conservation research, from the iconic kākāpō (nocturnal, ground parrot), to the ecology and control of introduced social wasps Professor Jacqueline Beggs will discuss the key challenges for conservation in New Zealand.

About our speaker

Professor Jacqueline Beggs whakapapa’s to Ngāti Awa.

Her research has focussed particularly on the ecology and control of invasive wasps, but she has also worked on kākā, kererū, kākāpō, and a range of invertebrates.

Jacqueline is a Professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the Director of the Centre for Biodiversity and Biosecurity at the University of Auckland.

She is interested in determining the rules that influence community structure and how understanding those rules can help us mitigate the impact of anthropogenic change.

Jacqueline advises the Minister of Primary Industries on biosecurity, and is a member of the Department of Conservation’s kākāpō recovery group. She also maintains a strong interest in science education and communication.

Refreshments will follow this inaugural lecture in Old Government House.