School of Biological Sciences


Stage 3 courses

Our third-year undergraduate courses are designed to give a more detailed and specific conclusion to your undergraduate majors and prepare you for possible postgraduate study.

Stage III offers you a wide range of specialist courses. Most have limited-entry based on the grade point average (GPA), calculated from results attained in previous semesters. At least four Stage III courses are required to major in Biological Sciences.

BIOINF 301 Introduction to Bioinformatics


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

An overview of the methods and applications of bioinformatics with specific reference to: Internet accessible database technology, database mining, applications for gene and protein sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis, three dimensional protein prediction methods, and genome sequence analysis.

Prerequisite: 30 points from Stage II in Biological Sciences.
Restriction: BIOSCI 359.
Assessment: Incourse 60% (Theory Test 10%, Practical 50%) Examination 40%.
Recommended textbook: Introduction to Bioinformatics (2008, 3rd edition) by Arthur M.Lesk. Oxford University.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Nicole Cloonan
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83441
Email: n.cloonan@auckland.ac.nz    

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BIOSCI 320 Pure and Applied Entomology


(15 points) Tāmaki (Labs in City) Semester One

An introduction to the biology of insects focusing on the evolution, ecology and importance of insect diversity. Topics covered in lectures include systematics and evolution, structure and physiology, behaviour and ecology, and applied entomology including the role of insects as pests and disease vectors, and methods used to control insect populations. Practicals include a 2-night field trip, and a major insect collection (3 April).

If you are interested in crop protection we suggest you take BIOSCI 320 and 321 together.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 103 and 15 points from Stage II Biological Science courses.
Assessment: Incourse 70% (Test 30%, Assignments 20%, Insect Collection 20%). Examination 30%.
Field trip: 2-night field trip: Depart 5pm Friday 14 March - 5pm Sunday 16 March
All day Laboratory 16 April
Recommended textbooks: Gullan, P.J. & Cranston, P.S., The Insects: An Outline of Entomology. 4th edition, Chapman and Hall
Coordinator: Associate Professor Greg Holwell
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83652
Email: g.holwell@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 321 Plant Pathology


(15 points) (City) Semester One

Microorganisms are of major importance to horticulture and agriculture. This course examines the biology of plant pathogens, plantmicrobial interactions at the cellular and molecular level and the epidemiology and control of plant diseases. Practicals will focus on techniques for isolation, culture, identification and study of plant pathogens.

If you are interested in crop protection we suggest you take BIOSCI 320 and 321 together.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 204 or BIOSCI 205.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Theory 20%, Practical 30%), Examination: 50%.
Textbook: Agrios, G.N., Plant Pathology, 5th edition, AP.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Matt Templeton
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 88703
Email: m.templeton@auckland.ac.nz
 

 

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BIOSCI 322 Evolution of Genes, Populations and Species


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

A thorough understanding of evolutionary principles and applications is critical for study in a wide variety of fields, including ecology, physiology, microbiology, development, molecular biology, biomedicine and bioinformatics. This course progresses from the basic Stage 2 material to explore the most recent theoretical advances in evolutionary thought, and how they can be applied at the DNA, population and species levels. SBS staff present their current research in fields including conservation genetics and biogeography, phylogenetics and speciation, experimental molecular evolution and the mechanisms of selection, sexual selection, genome evolution.

Practical work includes phylogenetic analyses, computer simulations, and hands-on lab research into the conservation genetics of endangered species using PCR techniques.

Recommended preparation: prior or concurrent enrolment in BIOSCI 202.
Prerequisite:
BIOSCI  210.
Assessment: Incourse 50%(Test 20%, Practical 30%), Examination: 50%.
Prescribed Textbook: D.J. Futuyma, Evolutionary Biology, 3rd edition or D.J. Futuyma, Evolution, 2nd edition (2013), Sinauer.
Coordinator: Dr Shane Lavery
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83764
Email: s.lavery@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 323 Plant Diversity


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

An introduction to the diversity, systematics and evolution of plants, with a focus on New Zealand species. In lectures, labs and fieldtrips, we explore key steps in the evolution of modern plants, and how evolution and human use of plants influences plant diversity. We focus on professional skills in researching and writing about contemporary topics in botany and plant taxonomy, and collecting, identifying, and archiving botanic specimens.

Prerequisite: BIOSCI 102 or 104, and 30 points at Stage II in Biological Sciences, Environmental Science or Geography.
Assessment: Incourse 75% (Incourse Test 25%, two assignments 15%, 25%, lab activities 10%) Examination: 25%.
Practical activities: TBA
Field Trip:
 
Swanson – daytrip on one Saturday, usually at end of wk 2 or 3.
Auckland Museum - daytrips only during first 3 days of week 2 of mid-semester break.
Auckland Botanic Gardens – daytrip during one lab slot after mid-semester break.
Coordinator: Dr Anne Gaskett
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 89509
Email: a.gaskett@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 328 Fisheries and Aquaculture


(15 points) (City) Semester One

Harvest and capture of aquatic organisms and inter-relationships with aquaculture. Fisheries and aquaculture are treated not as distinct disciplines but in the context of integrating exploitation and sustainable environmental integrity. Case studies include deep sea and coastal fisheries, and shellfish culture.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 207 or 208
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Field Course Assignment 30%, Test 20%) Examination 50%.
Recommended textbook: Jennings, S, Kaiser, MJ, Reynolds, JD, Marine Fisheries Ecology, Blackwell Science, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.
Field trip: Compulsory 2 day residential field course at the Leigh Marine Laboratory
Coordinator: Dr Neill Herbert (Leigh Marine Laboratory)
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83604
Email: n.herbert@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 329 Biology of Fish


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

A comprehensive coverage of the biology of fishes including their evolution, diversity and organismal biology. Coverage includes habitats of particular interest to New Zealand such as Antarctica, the deep sea, coral and temperate reefs, and New Zealand’s lakes and rivers.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 207 or 208.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Essay 10%, Practical 40%), Examination 50%.
Field trip:  Compulsory 3-day field trip in second half of mid-semester break:
Stream 1: 8-10 September (Mon-Wed) inclusive
Stream 2: 11-13 September (Thurs-Sat) inclusive
Recommended textbook: Helfman, Colette, Facey, Bowen, The Diversity of Fishes, 2nd edition. Wiley-Blackwell (2009)
Coordinator: Professor Kendall Clements
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 87223
Email: k.clements@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 330 Freshwater and Estuarine Ecology


(15 points) (City) Semester One

The structure, biodiversity and ecology of lakes, streams, wetlands and estuaries and linkages with near-shore marine habitats. Emphasis is placed on the role of science in monitoring and managing these ecosystems. Case studies include impacts of Auckland’s urban sprawl on stream, estuarine and near-shore marine habitats, and local estuaries as nurseries for fish.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 206 or BIOSCI 104, and 15 points from BIOSCI 205, 207, 208, and STATS 101 or 108.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Field Report 20%, Essay 20%, Lab Report 10%) Examination 50%.
Field trip and Laboratory: 22 March & 9 May
Coordinator: Dr Richard Taylor (Institute of Marine Science)
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83607
Email: rb.taylor@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 333 Marine Ecology


(15 points) (City) Semester One

Marine ecology includes patterns and processes in the ecology of benthic and pelagic plants and animals, including how environmental factors and physiology influence species distribution and abundance. Lectures cover: measuring biodiversity at population (including molecular), species and ecosystem levels; ecology of phytoplankton and seaweeds including factors that influence their growth and productivity; plant-herbivore interactions and chemical ecology; and interesting case studies related to research at the university. Practical work includes collecting and analysing ecological data with regard to landscape (habitat and community) biodiversity, and a laboratory study of nutrient uptake in seaweeds.

Prerequisite: BIOSCI 206, or 104 and 15 points from BIOSCI 205, 207, 208 and STATS 101 or STATS 108.
Assessment: In course 45%, Examination 55%
Field trip: Residential at Leigh Marine Laboratory either 21-22 March or 28-29 March
Recommended textbook: Kaiser M., et al., (2005) Marine Ecology: Processes, Systems and Impacts, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Rochelle Constantine
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 85093
Email: r.constantine@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 335 Ecological Physiology


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

Ecological (environmental) Physiology focuses on physiological diversity in relation to the environments in which organisms live. This course is about how animals cope with the physiological challenges of the environment. We consider animals at the interface between physiological, biological, biochemical or molecular approaches on the one hand, and ecology on the other. The effects of environmental factors on bio-energetics, nutrition and structural composition are emphasised. The adaptive and evolutionary strategies employed by a range of species in response to factors such as temperature, oxygen, water, pH, pressure and food availability, are considered. There is an emphasis on aquatic species reflecting the research interests of participating staff. The course aims to meet the needs of people with ecological interests wishing to apply an experimental approach to solving problems in environmental biology. We attempt to achieve the course aim through the use of research-based teaching. Because of the extensive literature in Ecological Physiology, the information presented is highly selective and cannot cover every field. We offer insights into specialised research fields that form the basis of an active postgraduate group in Biological Sciences.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 207 or 208.
Assessment: In course 50% (Practical 40%, Theory Test 10%) Examination 50%.
Recommended textbook: Animal Physiology, Second Edition. Richard W. Hill, Gordon A. Wyse, and Margaret Anderson. April 4, 2008, Sinauer Associates.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Tony Hickey
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 82615
Email: a.hickey@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 337 Animal Behaviour


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

This course will provide you with an introduction to all major facets of the study of animal behavior, with special attention to its evolution and ecological significance. In addition to identifying major patterns and processes of animal behavior, we will discuss observational and experimental techniques used to study behavior. We will explore major theoretical models directing past and current research in this field. Topics include methods for the observation and quantification of behaviour, natural selection and evolution of behaviour, orientation, circadian rhythms, neural and physiological mechanisms of behavior, communication, aggression, sexual reproduction, parental investment, mating systems and social behaviour. Knowledge of BIOSCI 206 is recommended.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 207 and STATS 101 or 108 or BIOSCI 209.
Assessment: Incourse 65% ( Practical 30%, Theory Test 35%), Examination 35%.
Field trip: Compulsory field trip in mid-semester break:
4-6 September or 11-13 September (Tiritiri Matangi)
or 30 - 31 August (Leigh)
or 12-14 September (Miranda)
Recommended reading: Krebs, J., Davies, N. (1993). An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology. Third Edition. Blackwell.
Coordinator: Dr Kristal Cain
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 85815
Email: k.cain@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 340 Plant Cell Biology and Biotechnology


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

This course focuses on selected topics in Plant Biotechnology and Plant Molecular Science. The lectures are presented by staff who are actively researching these areas from the University and from the nearby Crown Research Institute - Plant and Food Research. The information presented comes from application of a range of approaches - plant molecular biology, genetics, genomics, phylogenetics, cell biology, chemistry, biochemistry, and physiology. Topics include plant hormones and signalling, structure and biosynthesis of plant cell walls, regulation of flowering time, control of fruit ripening and post harvest quality and engineering of plant colour, health components and resistance to stress.

Prerequisites: 15 points from BIOSCI 201, 202 or 205
Assessment: Incourse 55% (Tests 30% each, Practical 25%), Examination 45%
Recommended textbook: Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. Plant Physiology. 6th Edn. Sinauer.
Coordinator: Professor Andrew Allan
Phone: +64 9 3737599 ext 86631
Email: a.allan@auckland.ac.nz or andrew.allan@plantandfood.co.nz

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BIOSCI 347 Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

The ecology and physiology of microorganisms in natural and engineered environments. Key themes include marine microbiology, the importance of microbial symbioses to life on Earth, and contemporary research methods in microbiology. Processes such as wastewater treatment and the production of bioactives are used to emphasise exploitation of microbial metabolism for environmental biotechnology purposes.

Prerequisites: 15 points from BIOSCI 204, MOLMED 201, MEDSCI 202.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Essay 10%, Practicals 25%, Terms Test 15%), Examination 50%.
Recommended textbook: Prescott, L.M., Harley, J.P., and Klein, D.A., Microbiology, 6th (international) edition (2005), McGraw Hill.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Mike Taylor
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 82280
Email: mw.taylor@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 348 Food and Industrial Microbiology


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

The use and scientific fundamentals of microorganisms in the production of foods and food additives, nutriceuticals and probiotics. Fermentation-derived food additives and their industrial processes including principles of metabolic engineering. Molecular and applied aspects of the fermentation processes for production of beer and wine including aroma generation and analysis. Microbial food spoilage, pathogens involved, food safety and quality control.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 106 and 15 points from BIOSCI 204, MOLMED 201, MEDSCI 202.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Lab Report 15%, Practical Test 10%, Terms Test 20%, Lab Book 5%), Examination 50%.
Laboratory: Two consecutive days in the first week of mid-semester break. TBA.
Prescribed reading:
Bibek R., Bhunia A., Fundamental Food Microbiology, 4th edition, CRC Press (McMillan).
Coordinator: Associate Professor Silas Villas-Boas
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83762
Email: s.villas-boas@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 349 Biomedical Microbiology


(15 points) (City) Semester One

The molecular biology of micro-organisms affecting human health. The characteristics of microbial pathogens, the origins of virulence, and the development of infectious disease. Routes of infection, evasion of host immune responses, and host-pathogen interactions. The molecular basis for vaccination and anti-microbial therapy, and the development of resistance to treatment.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 201 and either BIOSCI 204 or MEDSCI 202.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Theory 30%, Practical 20%) Examination 50%.
Reference material will be recommended.
Coordinator: Dr Richard Kingston
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 84414
Email: rl.kingston@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 350 Protein Structure and Function


(15 points) (City) Semester One

This course covers a variety of topics from the relationship between molecular structure and protein function, to the role of proteins in health, disease, and drug discovery. Techniques for the production, purification, and characterisation of native and recombinant proteins and structure determination will be covered, illustrated throughout with examples of the 3-dimensional structures of enzymes, multiprotein complexes, and membrane proteins.

This course provides an excellent background for students who wish to take BIOSCI 353, “Cellular Regulation, Hormones and Growth” in Semester two. For reasons of health and safety, students must enrol in this course in time for the first lab in Week 1 of the semester.

Prerequisites:
BIOSCI 201 and 203.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Practical 20% from Laboratory reports and Theory, 30% from two tests) Examination 50%.
Recommended textbooks:
C. Branden, Tooze J., Introduction to Protein Structure, 2nd edition, Garland.
Berg, J.M., Tymoczko, J.L., Stryer, L., Biochemistry, 6th edition (2007).
Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd edition, Worth.
or
Matthews, Van Holde, Ahern, Biochemistry, 3rd edition.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Shaun Lott
Phone: +64 9 3737599 ext 87074
Email: s.lott@auckland.ac.nz


Please note that no one textbook adequately covers the course content.

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BIOSCI 351 Molecular Genetics


(15 points) (City) Semester One

The analysis of genetic material in prokaryotes, viruses and eukaryotes is addressed in this course. The means by which genetic information is transferred and the mechanisms underlying genome diversity will be examined, together with the study of eukaryote genomes at the level of chromosome structure and organization. The molecular mechanisms underpinning mutation and sequence diversity in the human genome will be discussed, with a focus on heritable human disorders and disease modelling.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 201 and 202.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Theory 30% [two tests @ 15% each], Practical 20%), Examination 50%.
Recommended textbooks:
Griffiths, Miller et al., Introduction to Genetic Analysis, 8th or 9th edition, Freeman & Co.
Strachan T. & Reid, A.P., Human Molecular Genetics, 2nd or 3rd edition.
Watson et al., Recombinant DNA, 2nd edition.
Coordinator: Professor Russell Snell
Phone: +64 9 3737599 ext 85059
Email: r.snell@auckland.ac.nz

 

Please note that no one textbook adequately covers the entire course content.

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BIOSCI 353 Molecular and Cellular Regulation


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

The molecular mechanisms which mediate intracellular sorting, targeting and posttranslational modifi cation of biologically active molecules and the networks of intracellular and extracellular signals which regulate cell function form the focus of this course. The roles of growth factors, oncogenes, plasma membrane receptors, nuclear receptors, ion channels and membrane transporters are emphasised.

For reasons of health and safety, students enrolling in this course must enrol in time to attend the first lab in Week 1 of Semester.

Students who plan to take this course should consider enrolling in BIOSCI 350 (“Protein Structure and Function”) which provides an excellent background.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 201 and 203.
Assessment: Laboratory 20%, Essay 10%, Incourse Test 28% and Examination 42%.
Recommended textbook: Lodish et al, Molecular Cell Biology, 7th edition (2012) available on short loan.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Christopher Squire
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 87237
Email: c.squire@auckland.ac.nz


Please note that no one textbook adequately covers the entire course content.

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BIOSCI 354 Gene Expression and Gene Transfer


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

This course focuses on the molecular biology of plant and animal cells. It stresses genomes and genomics, gene expression and genetic engineering. Topics include: regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and eukaryotic diversity and complexity (including the transcriptome, enhancers, transcription factors and RNAi silencing); whole genome sequencing and microarray analysis of expression of the genes in a genome; methods of gene transfer in plants, insects and animals with genetic engineering for crop improvement and viral vectors for gene therapy in humans.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 202 and either 201, 203 or 205.
Assessment: Incourse 60% (Theory 35%, Practical 25%) Examination 40%.
Recommended textbooks:
Watson et al., Molecular Biology of the Gene, 6th edition, Pearson, Benjamin Cummings.
Lodish et al., Molecular Cell Biology, 7th edition (2012).
Coordinator: Associate Professor Jo Putterill
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 87233
Email: j.putterill@auckland.ac.nz



Please note that no one textbook adequately covers the entire course content)

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BIOSCI 356 Developmental Biology and Cancer


(15 points) (City) Semester One

Molecular, cellular and genetic aspects of normal and perturbed development focusing on a variety of model systems including Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, the zebrafish and the mouse. Molecular events underlying the development of body form, the contribution of stem cells to the different tissues of the body, and abnormalities of development that contribute to cancer.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 201 and 202.
Assessment: Incourse 40% (2 Lab Reports 10%, General Performance 5%, 1 test 25%) Examination 60%.
Recommended textbooks:
Gilbert, S.F., Developmental Biology, 9th edition, Sinauer.
G. Davis and C. Tickle. Principles of Development. 4th Edn. OUP.
Tannock, I.F., Hill, R.P., The Basic Science of Oncology, 4th edition, MacGraw-Hill.
R.A. Weinberg, The Biology of Cancer, 1st edition, Garland.
Coordinator: Dr Hillary Sheppard
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 81194
Email: h.sheppard@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 358 Nutritional Science


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

The scientific basis of nutrition focusing on its biochemistry and physiology linking diet to health and disease. Nutritional aspects of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and trace nutrients are covered in an integrated manner as are the clinical aspects of nutritionally related diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, Type II diabetes mellitus and cancer. Reference will be made to a broad range of examples, and a number of specific nutritional topics of current interest will also be included.

Prerequisites: BIOSCI 203.
Assessment: Incourse 50% (Lab Test 10%, Theory Test 20%, Lab Reports 10%, Research Essay 10%) Examination 50%.
Recommended textbook:
Zieglier, E.E., Filer, L.J. (eds), Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 7th edition, ILSI Press Washington DC.
Further information on journal articles of relevance will be provided during the course.
Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Miles-Chan
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 84322
Email: j.miles-chan@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 394 Conservation Ecology


(15 points) (Tāmaki) Semester One

Conservation of species and ecosystems. Population ecology, population growth, harvesting, and control, conservation practice, species and ecosystem management. Impacts and control of invasive species. Case studies in the conservation of threatened species. Population viability analysis, international conservation. This course assumes competence in statistics - students are strongly advised to enrol concurrently in BIOSCI 209 if they have not previously passed a fi rst or second year statistics course. BIOSCI 104 is an ideal precursor to this course and ecological knowledge equivalent to its content is assumed.

Prerequisite: BIOSCI 104 and 30 points at Stage ll in either Biological Sciences or Geography.
Assessment: Incourse 75% (Terms test 25%, two Assignments 15%, one Assignment 20%) Examination 25%.
Field trips/labs: Field Trip Wednesday 12 March, Field Trip Wednesday 9 April.
Coordinator: Associate Professor Jacqueline Beggs
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 86823
Email: j.beggs@auckland.ac.nz

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BIOSCI 395 Pacific Biogeography and Biodiversity


(15 points) (City) Semester Two

The Pacific Ocean with its many remote archipelagoes represents the grand stage for the study of Island Biogeography and Insular Biodiversity. This course will examine those processes across the Pacific. A multidisciplinary approach, involving the study of both plant and animal systematics and biogeography, will be a feature of the course.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in either Biological Sciences or Geography.
Assessment: Incourse 65% (one Practical Assignment 30%, Theory Test 35%) Examination 35%.
Recommended textbook: Keast, A., Miller, S.E. (eds), The Origin and Evolution of Pacific Island Biotas, S.E. Academic Publishing.
Coordinator: Dr Shane Wright
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 81775
Email: sd.wright@auckland.ac.nz

 

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BIOSCI 396 Terrestrial Ecology


(15 points) (Tāmaki) Semester One

This course surveys the front lines of experimental population and community ecology, focusing on biotic and abiotic factors controlling the distribution and abundance of terrestrial populations of plants and animals. The fundamental ecological processes explored in this course underpin the conservation and management of species and ecosystems. Content: Population dynamics, community composition, exploitation (predation, herbivory, parasitism), competition and facilitation, mutualisms, food web dynamics and contentious issues, such as biological invasions and ecosystem functioning.

Prerequisite: BIOSCI 206 or 104, and 15 points from either BIOSCI 205, 207 or 208 and STATS 101 or 108.
Assessment: Incourse 70% (Test 20%, Research Proposal 15%, Research Project 20%, Group exercise 5%. Presentation 10%) Examination 30%.
Field trips:
Field trip 1: 2 March (evening)- 4 March 2018
Field trip 2: 4 May (evening) - 6 May 2018
Laboratories:
Laboratory 1: Wednesday 7 March. 10 am-1 pm
Laboratory 2: Wednesday 23 May 9am-1pm
Textbook (optional): Begon, M., Howarth, RW., Townsend, CR., Essentials of Ecology, 4th edition (2014), Wiley.
Coordinator: Dr Bruce Burns (Tāmaki)
Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 83135
Email: b.burns@auckland.ac.nz

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